Landscapes series

Photo by Joshua Citarella, courtesy Carroll/Fletcher
  • Carroll/Fletcher at the Armory Show 2017, Platform: Evan Roth, March 2 - March 5, 2017, New York City
Photo by Bruno Lopes
  • Red Lines with Landscapes: Portugal (Lisbon), Fidelidade Arte, January 31 - May 22, 2020, Lisbon
Photo by Vinciane Lebrun-Verguethen, courtesy of the Mona Bismarck American Center
  • Landscape with a Ruin, Mona Bismarck American Center, October 20 - November 10, 2017, Paris
Photo by Vinciane Lebrun-Verguethen, courtesy of the Mona Bismarck American Center
  • Landscape with a Ruin, Mona Bismarck American Center, October 20 - November 10, 2017, Paris
Photo by Vinciane Lebrun-Verguethen, courtesy of the Mona Bismarck American Center
  • Landscape with a Ruin, Mona Bismarck American Center, October 20 - November 10, 2017, Paris
Photo by Alexandre Delmar
  • Red Lines with Landscapes: Portugal (Porto), Culturgest do Porto, October 3 - December 6, 2020, Porot
Photo by Alexandre Delmar
  • Red Lines with Landscapes: Portugal (Porto), Culturgest do Porto, October 3 - December 6, 2020, Porto
Photos courtesy Yuz Museum
  • Lying Sophia and Mocking Alexa (group exhibition), Yuz Museum, Shanghai,November 14, 2020 – January 31, 2021
Courtesy Erik Nordenhake
  • Common Interests and Reciprocal Esteem, Erik Nordenhake, April 5 - May 5, 2018, Stockholm
  • Way of Connecting, iMAL, 24 April - 17 May 2019, Brussels
Image courtesy Belenius/Nordenhake
  • Kites & Websites, Belenius/Nordenhake, March 31 - April 24, 2016, Stockholm
Photo by Jules Lister, courtesy of The Collection Museum
  • Red Lines with Landscapes at The Usher Gallery, The Collection Museum, June 1 - September 15, 2019, Lincoln, UK
Courtesy Erik Nordenhake
  • Erik Nordenhake at CODE, August 30 – September 2, 2018, Copenhagen, (Courtesy Erik Nordenhake)
Courtesy Erik Nordenhake
  • Erik Nordenhake at CODE, August 30 – September 2, 2018, Copenhagen
(Courtesy Carroll/Fletcher)
  • Looking at one thing and thinking of something else (group exhibition), 11 November 2016 – 29 April, 2017, London
Photo by Marc Knip, courtesy of NOORDERLICHT.

Text

On first sight these offerings might be read as a counter-proposition to the digital sphere; a valorization of the landscape outside/beyond cyberspace; a picturesque invitation to step away from the keyboard and out into the ‘real’ world. But the infra-red constitution of these images mean that they remain coloured by postindustrial reality: In fact, any virtual picture of the world that is conditional upon the delivery of data by fibre-optic cable relies upon infra-red signalling. The internet is, Roth reminds us, ‘an infra laser light, blinking through glass’.

This electro-magnetic filter, stacked atop more obviously ‘real’ geography, made up of minerals, molecules, biology, and so on, is increasingly powering the radical rearrangement of the latter. Its overlay is what turns a landscape into, additionally, a netscape – rendering it more intensively exploitable. ‘Filmed’ in the same frequency wave that the internet modulates at, if Roth’s moving images do not always show a figural cable then this is because it is unnecessary – after all, they are pushing the whole pictorial proposition through one, in a gesture that parallels facts on the ground.

Arrayed on the gallery wall, Roth’s red landscapes flicker across a mass of variously sized screens, suggestive of a mutant command and control center – with ethernet cables spilling onto the floor, out of the room and into the walls. As such, the viewer is presented with a series of windows onto the world, all opened at once like so many browser tabs. Leaning on the trope of the panopticon, this dramaturgy directs any question of morality towards the viewer. For these are not just windows. In light of Roth’s sketch of just how they operate, in laser beam, it would appear that the internet screen does not just get looked at: It touches the things that it mediates; it handles scenes and landscapes. Herewith, the most contemporary mutations of the appendage: the hand becomes the eye; the eye becomes an arm, a hand, a tentacle, a world.

— Nadim Samman

Exhibited

Press